Susun Weed ~ Wise Woman Tradition ~ parts three and four of eight

Be Your Own Herbal Expert, part three

by Susun S. Weed (copyright 2002-2011)

Know Your Plants

Herbal medicine is the medicine of the people. It is simple, safe, effective, and free. Our ancestors knew how to use an enormous variety of plants for health and well being. Our neighbors around the world continue to use local plants for healing and health maintenance, and you can too.

In your first lesson, you learned how to "listen" to the messages of plant's tastes. And you discovered that using plants in water bases (as teas, infusions, vinegars, and soups) -- and as simples -- allows you to experiment with and explore herbal medicine safely.

In your second lesson, you learned about herbs for teas and how to preserve and use their volatile oils. You leaned about vitamin- and mineral-rich herbal infusions, and how to use them to promote health and longevity. And you continued to think about using herbs simply.

In this lesson you will explore the differences between nourishing, tonifying, stimulating/sedating, and potentially-poisonous plants. You will learn how to prepare and use them for greatest effect and most safety.

All Herbs Are Not Equal

All herbs are not equal: some contain poisons, some don't; some of the poisons are not so bad; some can kill you - dead. I divide herbs into four categories for ease in remembering how (and how much) to use. Some herbs nourish us, some tonify; some bring us up or ease us down and some are frighteningly strong.

Nourishing herbs are the safest of all herbs. They contain few or no alkaloids, glycosides, resins, or essential oils (poisons).

Nourishing herbs are eaten as foods, cooked into soups, dried and infused, or, occasionally, made into vinegars.. They provide high-level nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, trace minerals, proteins, phytoestrogens and phytosterols, starches, simple and complex sugars, bioflavonoids, carotenes, and essential fatty acids (EFAs).

Nourishing herbs in water bases (infusions, soups, vinegars) may generally be taken in any quantity for any period of time. Side- effects -- even from excessive use -- are quite rare. Nourishing herbs are rarely used as tinctures (in alcohol), but when they are, their effects may be quite different.

It is generally considered safe to use nourishing herbs in water bases with prescription drugs. They may also be taken even if you are using tonifying, stimulating/sedating, or potentially poisonous herbs.

Some examples of nourishing herbs include:

    burdock roots
    chickweed herb; tincture dissolves cysts
    comfrey leaf
    elder blossoms and berries
    mushrooms
    nettle leaves and seeds
    oatstraw
    plantain leaves and seeds
    red clover blossoms
    seaweeds
    violet leaves and blossoms.

Tonifying herbs are generally considered safe when used in moderation. They may contain alkaloids or glycosides or essential oils, but rarely in quantities sufficient to harm us.

Tonifying herbs act slowly in the body and have a cumulative, rather than immediate, effect. They are most beneficial when used for extended periods of time. Tonifying herbs may be used regularly (but usually not daily) for decades if desired.

Tonifying herbs are prepared in water and alcohol bases: tinctures and wines, as well as infusions, vinegars, and soups.

The more bitter the tonic tastes, the less you need to take of it. The more bland the tonic tastes, the more you can use of it.
Side effects from overuse and misuse of tonics is uncommon but quite possible. The dividing line between what is tonifying and what is stimulating differs from person to person. Ginseng is tonifying to my sweetheart, but stimulating to me. Even herbal authorities disagree on which herbs are tonifying and which stimulating.

Take care to counter any tendency to overuse tonifying herbs or you may experience unwanted side effects.

It is generally considered safe to use tonifying herbs in water bases if you are taking prescription drugs. You may also use tonifying herbs while using nourishing, stimulating/sedating, and even potentially poisonous herbs. Tonifying herbs in alcohol bases are considered safe to use with nourishing herbs, but may produce unexpected results if combined with drugs or strong herbs.

Some examples of tonifying herbs include

    burdock seeds, especially in an oil base
    chasteberry
    mug/cronewort herb, especially in vinegar
    dandelion leaf, root and flowers
    echinacea root
    ginseng root
    hawthorn berries, leaves, and flowers
    horsetail herb
    motherwort leaves and flowers
    yellow dock leaves, roots, and seeds

Stimulating/sedating herbs frequently contain essential oils, alkaloids, glycosides, or resins. Because these substances cause strong physical reactions, stimulating/sedating herbs are known from their rapid and pronounced effects, some of which may be unwanted.

Stimulating/sedating herbs are most often prepared as tinctures (and wines), vinegars, teas, and infusions. Many stimulating/sedating herbs are used as seasonings in cooking as well. Despite my cookbook's injunction to use only a little, I long ago learned that more aromatic herbs in my soups gave a "livelier" result.

Because long-term use of stimulating/sedating herbs can lead to dependency, dose and duration of use must be carefully watched. A moderate to large dose, taken infrequently will produce better results than a small dose taken over a longer period.

Side effects from the use of stimulating/sedating herbs in water bases are not common but possible. Side effects from use in alcohol bases are frequent. Whenever stimulating/sedating herbs are used regularly, health is compromised.

It is not safe to take prescription drugs with stimulating/sedating herbs, but they may be taken even if you are using nourishing and/or tonifying herbs.

Some examples of stimulating/sedating herbs include:

    leaves of aromatic mints such as catnip, lemon balm, lavender, sage, skullcap
    cinnamon bark
    coffee beans
    ginger root
    kava kava root
    licorice root
    tobacco leaves
    uva ursi leaves
    valerian root
    willow bark and leaves

Potentially poisonous herbs always contain alkaloids, glycosides, resins, or essential oils. And they contain large quantities of those poisons, or in very potent forms.
Potentially poisonous plants can cause death directly, through the actions of their poisons on their targets (such as cardiac glycosides which stop the heart) or indirectly, by causing the liver and/or the kidneys to fail (as they attempt to cope with and clear the poison from the system).
Potentially poisonous herbs are usually extracted into alcohol (tinctures) and used in minute doses (1-3 drops). For safety sake use potentially poisonous herbs as infrequently as possible and for the shortest possible time.
Powdering and encapsulating increases the risk of side effects from any herb, but when we take stimulating/sedating and potentially poisonous herbs in capsuled, the side effects can be deadly.
Homeopathic pharmacy uses many potentially poisonous plants, but in such dilute doses that death is impossible. Side effects can occur, even with homeopathically tiny doses, however.
Potentially poisonous herbs activate intense effort on the part of the body and spirit and may cause nausea, visual disturbances, digestive woes, and allergic reactions even when used correctly.
Always be extremely cautious when using potentially poisonous herbs. Consult with at least three other knowledgeable herbalists who have used the plant in question before proceeding.
In general it is not considered safe to take potentially poisonous herbs which taking prescription drugs, other potentially poisonous herbs, or stimulating/sedating herbs. It is generally safe to use potentially poisonous herbs while using nourishing and tonifying herbs.

Some potentially poisonous herbs:

    belladonna
    castor beans
    cayenne
    cotton root
    goldenseal
    liferoot/groundsel
    nutmeg
    poke root
    tansy leaves and flowers
    wormwood

Experiment One
Spend some time alone quietly breathing. Tune into your body piece by piece (toes, feet, calves, knees, thighs, and so on). Use colors to draw yourself. Don't worry about making art. For the next month include some nourishing herb in your diet. Example: on Monday include seaweed as a vegetable for dinner, on Tuesday drink a quart of nettle infusion, on Wednesday make a soup with burdock and other roots, on Thursday drink a quart of red clover infusion, on Friday make garlic bread with at least one clove of freshly chopped garlic per slice, on Saturday drink a quart of oatstraw infusion, on Sunday drink a quart of comfrey/mint infusion. And so on. One month later, sit alone and breathe quietly. Tune into your body piece by piece. Use colors to draw yourself. Has anything changed? You can continue this experiment for as long as you like.

Experiment Two
Repeat experiment number one, but instead use any one tonic (preferably one that lives where you do) at least four times a week for one month. Again, note any changes in how you feel, how much energy and stamina you have, how much curiosity and delight you experience in life. You can continue this experiment for as long as you like also.

Experiment Three
What stimulants and sedatives do you use regularly? What happens if you give up one or more of them for a week? for a month? Try -- on different days -- at least one herbal stimulant and one herbal sedative and keep notes on your reactions.

Experiment Four
Choose one potentially poisonous plant that grows near you and cultivate a relationship with it. Read about it. Talk about it with others who have a relationship with it. Keep a special book for writing about your poisonous ally.

Further study
    1. Name five more nourishing herbs. Specify part used, preparation, and dosage.
    2. Name five more tonifying herbs. Specify part used, preparation, and dosage.
    3. Name five more stimulating/sedating herbs. Specify part used, preparation, and dosage.
    4. Name five more potentially poisonous herbs. Specify part used, preparation, and dosage. In what case and how would you use each?
    5. What is the difference between a tonic and a stimulant?

Advanced work
    * Give the botanical name (genus and species) for each plant listed.
    * List five nourishing herbs commonly sold in tincture form and describe what they are used for in that form.
    * Learn more about homeopathy.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Be Your Own Herbal Expert, part four

by Susun S. Weed (copyright 2002-2011)

How to Make Herbal Tinctures

Herbal medicine is the medicine of the people. It is simple, safe, effective, and free. Our ancestors used -- and our neighbors around the world still use -- plant medicines for healing and health maintenance. It's easy. You can do it too.
   
In your first lessons, you learned how to "listen" to the messages of plant's tastes, how to make effective water-based herbal remedies, and how to distinguish safe nourishing and tonifying herbs from the more dangerous stimulating and sedating herbs.

In this lesson, you will learn how to make herbal tinctures. You will make tinctures from fresh and dried roots as well as from fresh flowers and leaves. Then you will collect your tinctures into an Herbal Medicine Chest and begin to use them. Shall we begin?

Tinctures Act Fast
Tinctures are alcohol-based plant medicines. Alcohol extracts and concentrates many properties from plants, including their poisons. Alcohol does not extract significant amounts of nutrients, so tinctures are used when we want to stimulate, sedate, or make use of a poison. (Remember that nourishing herbs are best used in water bases such as infusions and vinegars.)
The concentrated nature of tinctures allows them to act quickly. It also makes them perfect for a first-aid kit or herbal medicine chest: a little goes a long way.

I have dozens of tinctures in my cabinet. But these are the ones I carry with me when I travel; they are the ones I don't leave home without. This is my traveling herbal medicine chest.

        Echinacea tincture
        Motherwort tincture
        Skullcap tincture
        Ginseng tincture
        Dandelion root tincture
        Wormwood tincture
        St Joan's Wort tincture
        Poke root tincture(danger)
        Yarrow tincture

Making Dried Root Tinctures
I strongly prefer to make tinctures from fresh plants. But many people have a hard time getting fresh plants. Most books therefore ignore fresh plant tinctures and focus on making tinctures only from dried plants. The only dried plant parts I use to make tinctures are roots and seeds. All other plant parts I use fresh when making a tincture. And I actually prefer to use fresh roots too.

    To make a tincture from dried roots:
    Buy an ounce of dried Echinacea augustifolia or Panax ginseng root.
    Put the whole ounce in a pint jar.
    The dried root should fill the jar about a third full. If not, use a smaller jar.
    Fill the jar to the top with the alcohol. Cap tightly and label.

Almost any alcohol can be used to make a tincture. My preference is 100 proof vodka. A lower proof, such as 80 proof, does not work nearly as well. Higher proofs, such as 198 proof or Everclear, can damage the liver and kidneys, so I don't use them to make medicine.

The tincture is ready in six weeks, but gets stronger the longer it sits. I like to wait about six months before using my ginseng tincture and a year before using my echinacea tincture.

Making Fresh Root Tinctures
Roots generally hold their properties even when dried. But two of my favorite root tinctures must be made from fresh roots are the dried ones have lost much of their effect.

    Making a tincture with a fresh root is similar to making one with a dried root.
    With great respect for the plant, dig up its root.
    Gently rinse mud away. (For more about digging dandelion root, see Healing Wise)
    Chop root into small pieces and fill a jar to the top with the chopped root.
    Fill jar to the top with alcohol. Cap tightly. Label.
    Fresh root tinctures are ready to use in six weeks.

Making Fresh Leaf and Flower Tinctures

I use only fresh flowers and leaves in my tinctures. These delicate plant part lose aroma and medicinal qualities when dried.
Tinctures can be made from dried herbs, but I find them inferior in in both effect (how well they work) and energetics (how many fairies are in it), not to mention taste (how many volatile substances remain) and somatics (how something makes you "feel").
What if the plants you need to make all the tinctures in your medicine chest don't grow where you live or you can't find them? Try one or more of these solutions.
Take a vacation to a place where the plant you need does grow. And make sure to go at the best time to gather it.
Find an herbal pen-pal who lives in the area where the plant you want to tincture grows. Have your pen-pal make a tincture of the fresh plant for you. You could make a tincture of something you have lots of to give to her, too.
Even if the plants do grow where you live, it may take a year or longer for you to find them, harvest them and make tinctures. While you are "in limbo," it's fine to buy tinctures to use in your herbal medicine chest.
When you finally find the plants you want, don't be afraid to make several quarts of tincture. Tinctures last for hundreds of years if protected from heat and light.

    St. Joan's wort tincture: Eases muscles spasms, anti-viral, pain-relieving.
    Pick yellow Hypericum perforatum flowers in the summer's heat.
    Fill, don't stuff, a jar with the blossoms and leaves.
    Fill jar to the top with alcohol. Cap tightly. Label. (It will turn bright red.)
    Your fresh St. Joan's wort tincture is ready to use in six weeks.

    Motherwort tincture: Eases menstrual cramps, mood swings, stress.
    Pick Leonurus cardiaca flowering tops (leaves and flowers) in early fall or late summer.
    Fill, don't stuff, a jar with coarsely chopped blossoms and leaves.
    Fill jar to the top with alcohol. Cap tightly. Label.
    Your fresh motherwort tincture is ready to use in six weeks.

    Skullcap tincture: Pain-relief, headache remedy
    Pick Scutellaria lateriflora flowering tops when there are seeds as well as flowers. Fill, don't stuff, a jar with the blossoms and leaves. Fill jar   to the top with alcohol. Cap tightly. Label.
    Your fresh skullcap tincture is ready to use in six weeks.

    Wormwood tincture: Counters food-poisoning and parasites.
    Pick Artemisia absinthemum leaves in the late summer or early fall, when mature.
    Fill, don't stuff, a jar, with the coarsely chopped leaves.
    Fill jar to the top with alcohol. Cap tightly. Label.
    Your fresh wormwood tincture is ready to use in six weeks.

    Yarrow tincture: Counters all bacteria internally and externally, repels insects.
    Pick Achillea millefolium flowing tops, white ones only, when in bloom.
    Fill, don't stuff, a jar, with the coarsely chopped herb.
    Fill jar to the top with alcohol. Cap tightly. Label.
    Your fresh yarrow tincture is ready to use in six weeks.

Double and Triple Tinctures

An herbalist in Austin Texas shared her special way of preparing a tincture that helps her keep her cool in stressful situations. She tinctures fresh lemon balm, gathered before it flowers, for six weeks, in 100 proof vodka. She pours that tincture over a new jar of fresh lemon balm leaves.
After that sits for six more weeks, it's a double tincture. She then pours the double tincture over another new jarful of fresh lemon balm and lets that sit for six weeks.
After which she has a triple tincture. She uses: "A dropperful sublingually works absolute wonders for me when I'm stressed out and ready to scream."

Plant Poisons
You remember that there are four types of poisons in plants: alkaloids, glycosides, essential oils, and resins. The first three are fairly easy to move from plants to a tincture.
Resins, because they "fear" water (hydrophobic) are difficult to tincture. When I want to tincture a resin I do use high proof alcohol. Some examples would be: pine resin tincture, balsam bud tincture, calendula flower tincture.

Taking Tinctures
I see many people put herbal tinctures under their tongues. I prefer to protect my oral tissues from the harsh, possibly cancer-causing, effects of the alcohol.
I dilute my tinctures in a little water or juice or even herbal infusion and drink them.

Using Your Tinctures
Here are a few of the ways I use the tinctures in my herbal medicine chest. For more information on using these tincture, see my books and my website.
Acid indigestion: 5-10 drops of Dandelion root or Wormwood tincture every ten minutes until relieved. I use a dose of Dandelion before meals to prevent heartburn.
Bacterial Infections (including boils, carbuncles, insect bites, snake bite, spider bite, staph): 30-50 drops Echinacea or Yarrow tincture up to 5 times daily. For severe infections, add one drop of Poke tincture to each dose.
Colds: to prevent them I use Yarrow tincture 5-10 drops daily; to treat them, I rely on Yarrow, but in larger quantity, say a dropperful every 3-4 hours at the worst of the cold and tapering off.

Cramps during menstruation: 10 drops Motherwort every 20 minutes or as needed. Used also as a tonic, 10 drops daily, for the week before.
Cramps in muscle: 25 drops St Joan's every 25-30 minutes for as long as needed.
Cramps in gut: 5-10 drops Wormwood, once.
Diarrhea: 3 drops Wormwood hourly for up to four hours.
Energy lack: 10 drops of Dandelion or Ginseng tincture in the morning.
Fever: 1 drop Echinacea for every 2 pounds of body weight; taken every two hours to begin, decreasing as symptoms remiss. Or a dropperful of Yarrow tincture every four hours.
Headache: 25 drops St Joan's plus 3-5 drops Skullcap every 10-15 minutes for up to two hours. 5 drops of Skullcap may prevent some headaches.
High blood pressure: 25 drops of Motherwort or Ginseng tincture 2-4 times a day.
Hot Flashes: 20-30 drops Motherwort as flash begins and/or 10-20 drops once or twice daily.
Insect: prevent bites from black flies, mosquitoes, and ticks with a spray of Yarrow tincture; treat bites you do get with Yarrow tincture to prevent infection.
Nervousness, hysteria, hyper behavior: 15 drops Motherwort every 15-20 minutes.
Premenstrual distress: 10 drops Motherwort twice a day for 7-10 days preceding menstruation or 10 drops daily all month.
Sore throat: Gargle with Yarrow tincture.
Swollen glands: 1 drop Poke root tincture each 12 hours for 2-5 days.
Viral infections (including colds and the flu): 25 drops of St. Joan's wort tincture every two hours. Add one drop of poke root tincture 2-4 times a day for severe cases.
Wounds: I wash with Yarrow tincture, then wet the dressing with Yarrow tincture, too.

In the next installment of Be Your Own Herbalist, you will learn about herbal oils, inlcuding infused and essential oils. Future lessons will explore the difference between fixing disease and promoting health, applications of the three traditions of healing, and using the six steps of healing to take charge of your own health and make sense of medicine.

Experiment One
    Choose one plant and make several small tinctures of it using different types of alcohol. Taste and smell each tincture every week or so for 6 - 8 weeks.

Experiment Two
    Buy or make different tinctures of the same plant: dried herb, fresh herb, timed with the moon, in different menstrums, made by different people, harvested in different places. Can you taste differences? Are the effects different? What else do you notice?

Experiment Three
    Make a double or triple tincture of motherwort, skullcap, or lemon balm. See if it relieves anxiety , hyperactivity, emotional distress, headaches. I use a dose of 5 - 30 drops. Remember skullcap can induce sleepiness.

Experiment Four
    Tincture four plants that are common to your area. Learn at least three things they can each be used for and if at all possible, use them.

Further study
    1. What is osmosis? Why is 100 proof vodka make stronger tinctures than 80 proof?
    2. What is a menstrum? What other menstrums are used to make tinctures?
    3. Of the four plant poisons, which are present in each of plants used in the medicine chest?
    4. Why don't I consider vinegars tinctures?
    5. How is a glyceride different from a tincture?

Advanced work
    * Make a tincture from a resinous plant.
    * Make a glyceride.
    * How is a standardized tincture made?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Susun Weed, http://www.susunweed.com and http://www.ashtreepublishing.com

permission to reprint this article MUST be obtained, contact Susun S Weed at: susunweed@herbshealing.com
PO Box 64
Woodstock, NY 12498
Fax: 1-845-246-8081

Calendar | Workshops | Intensives | Apprenticeships | Correspondence courses | Online courses | Teleseminars | Mentorship

ABOUT SUSUN S. WEED
Vibrant, passionate, and involved, Susun Weed has garnered an international reputation for her groundbreaking lectures, teachings, and writings on health and nutrition. She challenges conventional medical approaches with humor, insight, and her vast encyclopedic knowledge of herbal medicine. Unabashedly pro-woman, her animated and enthusiastic lectures are engaging and often profoundly provocative.

Susun Weed encourages women to work towards good health from the inside out. Her close-to-the-earth approach continues to break new ground in old ways, helping to make natural non-invasive solutions available to women from every walk of life.

Herbalist, wise woman, and teacher for over two decades, she is the founder of the Wise Woman Center in upstate New York and the author of four highly acclaimed books on alternative/complementary healthcare for women. Honored as a Peace Elder in 1996, Ms. Weed is respected worldwide as the voice of the Wise Woman tradition, the oldest tradition of healthcare on the planet.

The Wise Woman tradition maintains that health is flexibility and that deviations from normal (that is, problems) offer us an opportunity to reintegrate those parts of ourselves that we have cast out. This reintegration is accomplished through nourishment and the person emerges healed/wholed/holy. The Wise Woman tradition is compassionate and heart-centered. It honors the Earth and the special mysteries of women. It is simple, local, ecological, and invisible, choosing to use common plants, such as dooryard weeds, rather than exotic herbs from far away.

The Wise Woman Center, founded in 1984, is a safe place for women around the world to gather together to celebrate the wise woman within and to study herbal medicine and spirit healing with Susun and notable teachers such as Brooke Medicine Eagle, Z Buda pest, Vicki Noble, and Merlin Stone.

Ms. Weed has been called a backwards pioneer. She agrees: "I've gone backwards into prehistory, into herstory, to rediscover and rename something as ancient as humanity, but something which is perfectly relevant, indeed critical to our survival, today." That "some thing" is the Wise Woman tradition; a unique viewpoint from the distant past that she be lieves will help us find answers for our collective future.

The Wise Woman viewpoint that we are all connected and that a health crisis is symbolic as well as physical -- characterized by some as shamanic, by others as superstitious -- still exists in our society today, both in lay healing and in professions such as midwifery and psycho-therapy, but it usually goes unnamed. "One of the characteristics of this tradition is its integration into everyday life. By healing through nourishment, whether it is a hug or a special dinner, the wise woman acts invisibly whenever possible."

This is in marked contrast to other traditions of healing, according to Weed, who differ entiates three major healing traditions: the Scientific, the Heroic, and the Wise Woman. In the Scientific tradition the doctor is highly visible and the patient is reduced to a body part or a disease designation. In the Heroic or Holistic tradition, the healer is the one who knows the right way to do things and the patient must follow the rules in order to get well. In the Wise Woman tradition, illness is understood as an integral part of life and self-growth, with healer, patient and nature as co-participants in the healing process.

Much of today's alternative medicine comes from Heroic traditions, which traditionally emphasize fasting, purification, colonic cleansing, rigid dietary rules, and the use of rare botanicals in complicated formulae. Even much of metaphysical healing is applied this way: It views illness as a failure rather than a natural and potentially constructive process.

Susun Weed sees herself as a teacher, not a healer. "A healer is someone who does for you, while a teacher shows you how to do for yourself. When I work with a correspon dence course student or an apprentice, for instance, I'm working with the intention of helping her to know herself better, to learn how to listen to and nourish all parts of her self, which will allow her to become more healthy/whole/holy."

Susun reminds us that wellness and illness are not polarities. They are part of the contin uum of life. "We are constantly renewing ourselves, cell by cell, second by second, every minute of our lives. Problems, by their very nature, can facilitate deep spiritual and symnolic renewal, leading us naturally into expanded, more complete ways of thinking about and experiencing ourselves."

Ms. Weed maintains an active teaching/lecture schedule, with bookings throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany (where she also trains apprentices). She has taught at many prestigious schools including the National College of Naturopathic Medicine, Yale Nursing School, South Florida Midwifery School, Rocky Mountain Center for Botanical Studies, and the Waikato College of Herbal Studies. She currently sits on advisory boards for the California Institute of Integral Studies and the National Institute of Health's Rosenthal Center for Alternative/Complementary Medicines at Columbia University.

Ms.Weed is most well-known for her four best-selling books - recommended by expert herbalists and well-known physicians and used and cherished by millions of women around the world.

Susun Weed’s books include:

Healing Wise
Superb herbal in the feminine-intuitive mode. Complete instructions for using common plants for food, beauty, medicine, and longevity. Introduction by Jean Houston. 312 pages, index, illustrations.
Retails for $12.95
Order at: http://www.ashtreepublishing.com/bookshop/
   
NEW Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way
The best book on menopause is now better. Completely revised with 100 new pages. All the remedies women know and trust plus hundreds of new ones. New sections on thyroid health, fibromyalgia, hairy problems, male menopause, and herbs for women taking hormones. Recommended by Susan Love MD and Christiane Northrup MD. Introduction by Juliette de Bairacli Levy. 304 pages, index, illustrations.
Retails for $12.95
Order at: http://www.ashtreepublishing.com/bookshop/
For excerpts visit: http://www.menopause-metamorphosis.com

Breast Cancer? Breast Health!
Foods, exercises, and attitudes to keep your breasts healthy. Supportive complimentary medicines to ease side-effects of surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or tamoxifen. Foreword by Christiane Northrup, M.D. 380 pages, index, illustrations.
Retails for $14.95
Order at: http://www.ashtreepublishing.com/bookshop/

Testimonial:

Your zestful being and powerful energy makes being in your presence a joy, an educational experience and laughter and fun!

Thank you for your generous heart and giving and sharing above and beyond what is anticipated or expected..... it is truly appreciated and heart felt.

Renate T

By using Pacific Holistic, information/service either via the internet, email or phone, you are deemed to consent to the terms and conditions of the following disclaimer: You hereby agree that you voluntarily seek the alternative health care services from Merrie Bakker, and that you hereby agree that the health care services from Merrie Bakker are intended to complement, not replace, the advice of your own physician or other healthcare professionals, whom you should always consult about your individual needs that may require diagnosis or medical treatment and before starting or stopping any medication. All information that is provided by Merrie Bakker online and elsewhere, is done so in an effort to educate and is complementary and holistic in nature.